Difference between revisions of "Perimeter Command"

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; Perimeter[ <Conic> ]:  If the given conic is a circle or ellipse, this command returns its perimeter. Otherwise the result is undefined.
 
; Perimeter[ <Conic> ]:  If the given conic is a circle or ellipse, this command returns its perimeter. Otherwise the result is undefined.
 
:{{example|1=<div><code><nowiki>Perimeter[x^2 + 2y^2 = 1]</nowiki></code> yields ''5.4''.</div>}}
 
:{{example|1=<div><code><nowiki>Perimeter[x^2 + 2y^2 = 1]</nowiki></code> yields ''5.4''.</div>}}
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:{{note|See also [[Circumference Command|Circumference]] command.}}
 
; Perimeter[ <Locus> ]:  If the given locus is finite, this command returns its approximate perimeter. Otherwise the result is undefined.
 
; Perimeter[ <Locus> ]:  If the given locus is finite, this command returns its approximate perimeter. Otherwise the result is undefined.

Revision as of 08:42, 24 August 2015


Perimeter[ <Polygon> ]
Returns the perimeter of the polygon.
Example:
Perimeter[Polygon[(1, 2), (3, 2), (4, 3)]] yields 6.58.
Perimeter[ <Conic> ]
If the given conic is a circle or ellipse, this command returns its perimeter. Otherwise the result is undefined.
Example:
Perimeter[x^2 + 2y^2 = 1] yields 5.4.
Note: See also Circumference command.
Perimeter[ <Locus> ]
If the given locus is finite, this command returns its approximate perimeter. Otherwise the result is undefined.
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