Difference between revisions of "Circle Command"

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;Circle[ <Point M>, <Number r> ]:Yields a circle with center ''M'' and radius ''r''.
 
;Circle[ <Point M>, <Number r> ]:Yields a circle with center ''M'' and radius ''r''.

Revision as of 22:04, 9 March 2013



Circle[ <Point M>, <Number r> ]
Yields a circle with center M and radius r.
Circle[ <Point M>, <Segment> ]
Yields a circle with center M and radius equal to the length of the given segment.
Circle[ <Point M>, <Point A> ]
Yields a circle with center M through point A.
Circle[ <Point A>, <Point B>, <Point C> ]
Yields a circle through the given points A, B and C.

Comments

Tips[edit]

Use circles to fix the distance between two objects[edit]

Circles are a great way to make the distance between two objects constant: If there are two points A and B on two lines g (point A) and h (point B) where A can be moved and B should have the constant distance r to A you can define B as the intersection between the line h and the circle around A with the radius r. As a circle intersects a line at two points (in case it's not tangetial or passing by) you have to hide & ignore the second intersection.

An illustration of the described technique to fix the distance between two points A and B1
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